Tuesday, July 23, 2024

Eola swans test positive amid lake deaths

Orlando officials have confirmed positive cases of avian influenza in swans at Lake Eola Park. Over the past two weeks, city workers have found several dead birds in Lake Eola Park. The deaths prompted a quick consultation with local veterinarians, who recommended authorities send two of the dead swans for postmortems. The city says it sent a dead Royal Mute Swan and a dead Australian Black Swan, both of which tested positive for bird flu. Last weekend, two more birds were found dead. Regarding possible criminal activity, the city contacted the Orlando Police Department and began an investigation. Both the swans have been sent for postmortem, but the results are still pending. A lot of people were very surprised because they hadn't heard anything about it, but the city released the information on Tuesday and a spokesperson for the city of Orlando says they're taking every precaution.” We come here all the time, and you know today, I brought. My family. They're all from Brazil. Visitors, we're all feeding the birds. It's scary because we have kids here,” said visitor Paul Cisneros. “It's not good, it looks terrible. We don't touch the birds when we're out here, we feed them,” said Ovid Paul, a Lake Eola visitor. “Everybody comes here to feed them. Look at them. They're a major attraction. We've got to take care of them,” resident Aaron Henderson said. A spokesperson for the city of Orlando said it will continue to monitor and report new cases. The city says it does everything it can to keep the community safe. and control the spread of avian influenza. Out of an abundance of caution, the city says it has pre-disinfected many surfaces throughout the park and will continue to do so during this time. The city also advised its employees to take precautions such as laundry. shoes, uniforms and equipment. According to the CDC, avian influenza can be transmitted to humans, but the city says it's extremely rare. The city said only one case has been reported in the U.S. since 2022. Doctors say the symptoms A runny nose, sore throat, and fever are similar to the common cold. There are a few things the community can do to protect themselves, including: Avoiding direct contact with birds in Lake Eola Park and observing them only from a distance. This applies to both. Pets in the park. Avoid contact with bird droppings. Remove shoes when entering homes and clean them if contamination is suspected Monitor the situation and report any new infections to the FWC. Orlando will continue to be vigilant about disinfecting the park. Top headlines: Man sues Disney Springs restaurant, doctor's wife dies of severe allergies Police: Officer shoots through windshield after vehicle speeds toward cruiser in Orange County neighborhood Authorities: Small plane tries to land at Orlando Sanford International Airport

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Orlando officials have confirmed positive cases of avian influenza in swans at Lake Eola Park.

Over the past two weeks, city workers have found several dead birds in Lake Eola Park. The deaths prompted quick consultations with local veterinarians, who recommended authorities send two of the dead swans for postmortems.

The city says it sent a dead Royal Mute Swan and a dead Australian Black Swan, both of which tested positive for bird flu.

Two more birds were found dead last weekend.

Concerned about possible criminal activity, the city contacted the Orlando Police Department and began an investigation.

Two of the swans have been sent for post-mortem, but the results are still pending.

Many were surprised to hear nothing about it, but the city released the information on Tuesday and a spokesperson for the city of Orlando says they are taking all precautions.

“We come here all the time, you know today, I brought my family. They're all from Brazil and we all feed the birds. It's scary because we have kids here,” said visitor Paul Cisneros.

“It's not good, it looks terrible. We don't touch the birds when we're out here, we feed them,” said Lake Eola visitor Ovid Paul.

“Everybody comes here to feed them. Look at them. They're a major attraction. We've got to take care of them,” resident Aaron Henderson said.

A spokesperson for the city of Orlando says it continues to monitor, track and report any new cases.

The city says it is doing everything it can to keep the community safe and contain the spread of bird flu.

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Out of an abundance of caution, the city says it has pre-disinfected many surfaces throughout the park and will continue to do so at this time. The city instructed its employees to take extra precautions, such as washing shoes, uniforms and equipment.

According to the CDC, avian influenza can be transmitted to humans, but the city says it's extremely rare. Only one case has been reported in the United States since 2022, the city said.

Doctors say the symptoms are similar to normal flu like runny nose, sore throat and fever.

There are things communities can do to protect themselves, including:

  • Avoid direct contact with birds at Lake Eola Park and observe them only from a distance. This applies to people and pets in the park.
  • Avoid contact with bird droppings.
  • Removing shoes when entering homes and cleaning them if contamination is suspected.

Based on the size of the park and the number of birds, the city says the FWC recommends letting the flu run its course because some birds may develop immunity.

The city says it will continue to monitor the situation and report any new infections to the FWC.

Orlando will continue to be vigilant about disinfecting the park.

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