Top News

Letter to the Editor: Tips for young drivers

sur le fil de presse
sur le fil de presse

With teenagers and young adult drivers accounting for almost a quarter of all road related fatalities on Canadian roads, RSA Canada is urging younger drivers to exercise extra caution as they head off on summer road trips.

According to Transport Canada's Road Safety in Canada report (2011), 24 per cent of fatalities and 26 per cent of those seriously injured were 16 to 24 years of age.

"These kinds of statistics are alarming. Too many younger drivers are being killed or injured on our roads," says Brodie Bott, RSA's Communications Manager. "We know teens aren't always receptive to safety messages, but it's vitally important that parents have a refresher chat with their teens before they head off with friends on a summer road trip."

RSA Canada suggests parents remind teenage drivers about the top four things they can do to stay safe on the road during summer.

1. Be smart and wear a seatbelt. Using a seatbelt might be simple, but it's also the most effective way of being safer behind the wheel.

2. Don't text and drive. Inexperienced drivers combined with distractions like text messages, music players and Facebook is a recipe for disaster. Parents need to lead by example and not use cell phones while behind the wheel. Remember - it is against the law to text and drive.

3. Ease off the gas. Speeding can not only increase the risk of a fatal car crash, but it also leads to costly fines and an increase insurance rates. Remind your kids about sticking to the speed limit even if their friends are pressuring them to hurry up.

4. Don't drink and drive. Alcohol and driving don't mix regardless of whether a driver is experienced or inexperienced. Teen should feel comfortable calling home for a ride if they feel they're not in a position to drive.

- RSA Canada

According to Transport Canada's Road Safety in Canada report (2011), 24 per cent of fatalities and 26 per cent of those seriously injured were 16 to 24 years of age.

"These kinds of statistics are alarming. Too many younger drivers are being killed or injured on our roads," says Brodie Bott, RSA's Communications Manager. "We know teens aren't always receptive to safety messages, but it's vitally important that parents have a refresher chat with their teens before they head off with friends on a summer road trip."

RSA Canada suggests parents remind teenage drivers about the top four things they can do to stay safe on the road during summer.

1. Be smart and wear a seatbelt. Using a seatbelt might be simple, but it's also the most effective way of being safer behind the wheel.

2. Don't text and drive. Inexperienced drivers combined with distractions like text messages, music players and Facebook is a recipe for disaster. Parents need to lead by example and not use cell phones while behind the wheel. Remember - it is against the law to text and drive.

3. Ease off the gas. Speeding can not only increase the risk of a fatal car crash, but it also leads to costly fines and an increase insurance rates. Remind your kids about sticking to the speed limit even if their friends are pressuring them to hurry up.

4. Don't drink and drive. Alcohol and driving don't mix regardless of whether a driver is experienced or inexperienced. Teen should feel comfortable calling home for a ride if they feel they're not in a position to drive.

- RSA Canada

Recent Stories