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The north breeds trustworthy folk

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While crime rates in the urban centres in Newfoundland and Labrador continue to rise, some rural parts of the province still have a sense of security.

Most people on the Great Northern Peninsula don't lock their doors and neighbours still walk in. It's the norm in this area.

The sense of security was obvious last week when hundreds of people flocked to Port Saunders to take part in Chase the Ace.

The prize was a whopping $104,000. The winner, Carolyn Way from Green Island Cove, walked to her vehicle, unaccompanied, with two cheques equaling the large sum.

For other large prize draws around the province it's not always the same. For example during previous seasons of St. John's Ice Caps games, 50/50 draw winners - some with prize money of $20,00 - had an escort. And who would blame someone from getting escorted safely?

Fear of theft and violence are real. But for some reason, the Northern Peninsula has a different atmosphere. People up here know their neighbours personally.

There are unknown visitors during tourism season, but overall, most don't see a need to feel threatened of possible crimes. After all, who's going to drive four hours north on rough roads just to break into someone's car for their Tim Horton's change?

But what makes the Northern Peninsula so different from other places?

Some believe it's the old fashioned values people have here. Many of the residents are elderly and retired, while others are young families just starting their lives in a more rural community.

Driving from Gros Morne all the way to L'Anse aux Meadows, and down to Englee, there's something unique about the sides of the roads. There are hundreds of piles of chopped wood.

The wood is neatly stacked, with some of them labeled with numbers, while others are not.

Also, there are dozens of roadside gardens. Locals plant their vegetables and cover the plots with snow fence to keep moose and caribou out.

These things are out in the open. One would think the owners of the wood or the gardens would be concerned others might take their haul?

But they aren't.

One of the sayings up here is there's nothing worse than stealing another man's wood. It explains why no one touches the woodpiles.

Everyone lives by the honour system. They trust in each other enough that they don't need to be concerned with others taking their wood or crops.

That is something unique about the Northern Peninsula, and maybe why it's referred to as "Great."

Most people on the Great Northern Peninsula don't lock their doors and neighbours still walk in. It's the norm in this area.

The sense of security was obvious last week when hundreds of people flocked to Port Saunders to take part in Chase the Ace.

The prize was a whopping $104,000. The winner, Carolyn Way from Green Island Cove, walked to her vehicle, unaccompanied, with two cheques equaling the large sum.

For other large prize draws around the province it's not always the same. For example during previous seasons of St. John's Ice Caps games, 50/50 draw winners - some with prize money of $20,00 - had an escort. And who would blame someone from getting escorted safely?

Fear of theft and violence are real. But for some reason, the Northern Peninsula has a different atmosphere. People up here know their neighbours personally.

There are unknown visitors during tourism season, but overall, most don't see a need to feel threatened of possible crimes. After all, who's going to drive four hours north on rough roads just to break into someone's car for their Tim Horton's change?

But what makes the Northern Peninsula so different from other places?

Some believe it's the old fashioned values people have here. Many of the residents are elderly and retired, while others are young families just starting their lives in a more rural community.

Driving from Gros Morne all the way to L'Anse aux Meadows, and down to Englee, there's something unique about the sides of the roads. There are hundreds of piles of chopped wood.

The wood is neatly stacked, with some of them labeled with numbers, while others are not.

Also, there are dozens of roadside gardens. Locals plant their vegetables and cover the plots with snow fence to keep moose and caribou out.

These things are out in the open. One would think the owners of the wood or the gardens would be concerned others might take their haul?

But they aren't.

One of the sayings up here is there's nothing worse than stealing another man's wood. It explains why no one touches the woodpiles.

Everyone lives by the honour system. They trust in each other enough that they don't need to be concerned with others taking their wood or crops.

That is something unique about the Northern Peninsula, and maybe why it's referred to as "Great."

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