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Editorial: Let your provincial flags fly

['Melissa Jenkins']
['Melissa Jenkins']

If you ask someone from Labrador if they are a Newfoundlander or a Labradorian, chances are they would say Labradorian first. Just like if you asked someone from the island, they would likely tell you they’re a Newfoundlander.

Newfoundlanders and Labradorians have a unique and proud heritage from the rest of Canada, but also from each other. To celebrate these differences, both have an individual flag.
When the Labrador flag was officially recognized last September, it began flying at the Quebec border.
Those living on the island and away from Labrador often have a flag they fly or hang up wherever they go. MHA Lisa Dempster is one of those people. She hung a flag over her deck in the Bahamas during a vacation last year. It became a focal point for communication, with many people asking her family about it.
For those who are not from Labrador, what does this flag mean? Well, for those in St. Anthony, it’s about to mean more than just a flag.
Last week, council agreed to have the flag displayed, whether it is flown at the town hall or placed elsewhere.
Several years ago, the mayor wanted to show support for the flag and its journey to becoming an official symbol for Labrador. Unfortunately because of some communication issues, the flag was never delivered. But now it’s ready to go, and the town will receive it in the coming weeks.
Why would a town on the Northern Peninsula want to fly the Labrador flag? It’s simple. Often, when those in southern Labrador have medical issues, they require a visit to a health facility. The closest one is the Charles C. Curtis Memorial Hospital in St. Anthony.
While in St. Anthony, many of those visitors stay overnight, go to restaurants, visit stores, pharmacies and other places around town. This is a driver of the local economy.
St. Anthony Mayor Ernest Simms said it best when he explained his town is connected to Labrador, and Labradorians deserve to feel that connection when they drive through.
Newfoundlanders and Labradorians may have different flags, different ways of life and different roots, but at the end of the day, towns like St. Anthony are demonstrating their close connection and unity.
Regardless of whether you fly a Newfoundland flag or Labrador flag, fly it with pride. You’re both a Newfoundlander and Labradorian. You can’t have one without the other.

Newfoundlanders and Labradorians have a unique and proud heritage from the rest of Canada, but also from each other. To celebrate these differences, both have an individual flag.
When the Labrador flag was officially recognized last September, it began flying at the Quebec border.
Those living on the island and away from Labrador often have a flag they fly or hang up wherever they go. MHA Lisa Dempster is one of those people. She hung a flag over her deck in the Bahamas during a vacation last year. It became a focal point for communication, with many people asking her family about it.
For those who are not from Labrador, what does this flag mean? Well, for those in St. Anthony, it’s about to mean more than just a flag.
Last week, council agreed to have the flag displayed, whether it is flown at the town hall or placed elsewhere.
Several years ago, the mayor wanted to show support for the flag and its journey to becoming an official symbol for Labrador. Unfortunately because of some communication issues, the flag was never delivered. But now it’s ready to go, and the town will receive it in the coming weeks.
Why would a town on the Northern Peninsula want to fly the Labrador flag? It’s simple. Often, when those in southern Labrador have medical issues, they require a visit to a health facility. The closest one is the Charles C. Curtis Memorial Hospital in St. Anthony.
While in St. Anthony, many of those visitors stay overnight, go to restaurants, visit stores, pharmacies and other places around town. This is a driver of the local economy.
St. Anthony Mayor Ernest Simms said it best when he explained his town is connected to Labrador, and Labradorians deserve to feel that connection when they drive through.
Newfoundlanders and Labradorians may have different flags, different ways of life and different roots, but at the end of the day, towns like St. Anthony are demonstrating their close connection and unity.
Regardless of whether you fly a Newfoundland flag or Labrador flag, fly it with pride. You’re both a Newfoundlander and Labradorian. You can’t have one without the other.

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