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Bullying bullies


It's funny how some people seem to think that anonymous Internet bullying is just fine - if you're on the right side.

A lot has been written about Lynelle Cantwell, a brave young woman who took to social media to react to anonymous bullies who built and posted a poll rating "ugliest girls" at a Torbay high school.
"I'm sorry that you'll never get the chance to know the kind of person I am. I may not look OK on the outside. But I'm funny, nice, kind, down to Earth, not judgmental, accepting, helpful, and I'm super easy to talk to. That's the same for every other girl on that list that you all put down," Cantwell wrote
To her credit, Cantwell took the high road: she didn't attack her attackers, merely made her point clearly and honestly.
And she's been lauded far and wide for her actions.
Strange, then, that, as an offshoot, people who claim to be her supporters would use exactly the tactics she suggests are so very wrong: anonymous attacks.
Take a trip through the legions of media stories on her actions, and you'll be amazed by the reaction. Many comments posted on the stories - the vast majority - have been extremely supportive of Cantwell's position.
But others viciously attack those who created the anonymous poll.
Some of the attacks are simple enough: "They should be outed ... named and shamed ... for sure."
"I would like to see untouched pictures of those that posted the contest - without their makeup. "
"To the bullies (if they can read) ... not cool. An apology is in order."
But other comments go far further.
"The swine who organized or take part in this poll should be castrated; they must not be allowed to procreate. The fact that they are all 'anonymous' speaks volumes for their lack of masculinity or courage." (Posted anonymously, of course.)
"Bullies need to go to jail or get the crap beaten out of them to learn. True some do feel bad decades later but that doesn't help the victims while they're being bullied."
"I hope the kids who bullied me in high school are hungry and in pain right now. They deserve it, as do the bullies in this case."
"These kids are almost full-blown psychopaths and sadists that get a real pleasure from the misery they inflict on others. It is not normal, it is very abnormal and needs to be addressed promptly and without coddling and nice words. They should be given a taste of their own medicine in order to empathize with those they so joyously and callously victimized. Forget the kid gloves and bring out the big guns. This has to be stopped."
We shouldn't miss the point here: anonymous bullying is hurtful, even if the person you're targeting is themselves a bully.
If you're an anonymous attacker, you're part of the problem, not part of the solution. The end does not justify your means.

A lot has been written about Lynelle Cantwell, a brave young woman who took to social media to react to anonymous bullies who built and posted a poll rating "ugliest girls" at a Torbay high school.
"I'm sorry that you'll never get the chance to know the kind of person I am. I may not look OK on the outside. But I'm funny, nice, kind, down to Earth, not judgmental, accepting, helpful, and I'm super easy to talk to. That's the same for every other girl on that list that you all put down," Cantwell wrote
To her credit, Cantwell took the high road: she didn't attack her attackers, merely made her point clearly and honestly.
And she's been lauded far and wide for her actions.
Strange, then, that, as an offshoot, people who claim to be her supporters would use exactly the tactics she suggests are so very wrong: anonymous attacks.
Take a trip through the legions of media stories on her actions, and you'll be amazed by the reaction. Many comments posted on the stories - the vast majority - have been extremely supportive of Cantwell's position.
But others viciously attack those who created the anonymous poll.
Some of the attacks are simple enough: "They should be outed ... named and shamed ... for sure."
"I would like to see untouched pictures of those that posted the contest - without their makeup. "
"To the bullies (if they can read) ... not cool. An apology is in order."
But other comments go far further.
"The swine who organized or take part in this poll should be castrated; they must not be allowed to procreate. The fact that they are all 'anonymous' speaks volumes for their lack of masculinity or courage." (Posted anonymously, of course.)
"Bullies need to go to jail or get the crap beaten out of them to learn. True some do feel bad decades later but that doesn't help the victims while they're being bullied."
"I hope the kids who bullied me in high school are hungry and in pain right now. They deserve it, as do the bullies in this case."
"These kids are almost full-blown psychopaths and sadists that get a real pleasure from the misery they inflict on others. It is not normal, it is very abnormal and needs to be addressed promptly and without coddling and nice words. They should be given a taste of their own medicine in order to empathize with those they so joyously and callously victimized. Forget the kid gloves and bring out the big guns. This has to be stopped."
We shouldn't miss the point here: anonymous bullying is hurtful, even if the person you're targeting is themselves a bully.
If you're an anonymous attacker, you're part of the problem, not part of the solution. The end does not justify your means.

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