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Unveiling the war memorial


The new war memorial for those who gave their lives in the First World War was unveiled in Channel on Thursday, June 27, 1929. 

It was a solemn, but very impressive event — a “red letter” day in the town’s history. The ceremony was arranged by A. P. Carter, president of the Channel Branch of the Great War Veterans Association (GWVA), which helped raise funds for the memorial.
The weather was perfect and long before the hour set for the commencement of the service, a large crowd from the towns in the vicinity gathered near the courthouse.
Members of the two men’s lodges and the Ladies Orange Benevolent Association dressed in full regalia, parading to their positions.
At 4.30 p.m. sharp, Capt. E. R. Drummond along with Lt.-Cmdr Startin of the Royal Navy arrived. They led a detachment of some 60 officers and seamen, a firing party of 20 marines, and the marching band from HMS Capetown in port for the celebration. The guard of honour was made up of 12 First World War veterans from the area under command of Sgt. Williams.
At 4:40 p m., former magistrate Robert T. Squarey arrived as a special guest. He was escorted by First World War veteran Lance-Cpl. Samuel Fiander, one of the original Blue Puttees of the Newfoundland Regiment. Squarey accepted the memorial and unveiled it on behalf of the people.
The dedication ceremony was then conducted by Rev. Canon H.J. Read, assisted by Rev. A. R. Baggs, Adjutant Kean of the Salvation Army and Rev. Evans, chaplain onboard HMS Capetown.
The firing party fired three volleys, after which the last post was sounded by the bugler. Two minutes silence was observed. The naval band accompanied the combined church choirs in singing “O God Our Help in Ages Past.”
Floral wreaths were then placed at the base of the memorial in tribute to those who died by R. T. Squarey, Starten, the GWVA president and relatives of deceased sailors and soldiers. Members of the naval contingent were served light refreshments by the GWVA Ladies Auxiliary at the courthouse. The naval band treated the town to a concert at the courthouse grounds until 10 p.m. and thus concluded a special day in Channel for veterans and their families.
The memorial monument was made of five recessed sections of granite, topped with a tapered column 10 feet high that held plates containing names and military symbols. The unveiling marked 11 years after the war that an enduring memorial was erected in memory of so many who suffered in the great conflict from this community. It would long stand in remembrance of the sailors and soldiers of Channel and Port aux Basques who made the supreme sacrifice. The names occupying the front face of the memorial are as follows:
From the Royal Newfoundland Regiment: Channel’s only Blue Puttee Lance-Cpl. Lewellyn J. Carter, Lance-Cpl. Edward A. Ayre, Lance-Cpl Morgan Gallop and privates Israel A. Anderson, Morley Soper, Edward J. Strickland, James H. LeRiche and Walter H. Mackay.
From the Royal Newfoundland Navy Reserve: Able Seamen George P. Bragg and James Anderson.
From Canadian regiments: privates George W. Stephens, Edgar L. Mackay and Enos E. Ash. Two names omitted at the time were privates Harry Dominy and Stanley E. Sealey.

It was a solemn, but very impressive event — a “red letter” day in the town’s history. The ceremony was arranged by A. P. Carter, president of the Channel Branch of the Great War Veterans Association (GWVA), which helped raise funds for the memorial.
The weather was perfect and long before the hour set for the commencement of the service, a large crowd from the towns in the vicinity gathered near the courthouse.
Members of the two men’s lodges and the Ladies Orange Benevolent Association dressed in full regalia, parading to their positions.
At 4.30 p.m. sharp, Capt. E. R. Drummond along with Lt.-Cmdr Startin of the Royal Navy arrived. They led a detachment of some 60 officers and seamen, a firing party of 20 marines, and the marching band from HMS Capetown in port for the celebration. The guard of honour was made up of 12 First World War veterans from the area under command of Sgt. Williams.
At 4:40 p m., former magistrate Robert T. Squarey arrived as a special guest. He was escorted by First World War veteran Lance-Cpl. Samuel Fiander, one of the original Blue Puttees of the Newfoundland Regiment. Squarey accepted the memorial and unveiled it on behalf of the people.
The dedication ceremony was then conducted by Rev. Canon H.J. Read, assisted by Rev. A. R. Baggs, Adjutant Kean of the Salvation Army and Rev. Evans, chaplain onboard HMS Capetown.
The firing party fired three volleys, after which the last post was sounded by the bugler. Two minutes silence was observed. The naval band accompanied the combined church choirs in singing “O God Our Help in Ages Past.”
Floral wreaths were then placed at the base of the memorial in tribute to those who died by R. T. Squarey, Starten, the GWVA president and relatives of deceased sailors and soldiers. Members of the naval contingent were served light refreshments by the GWVA Ladies Auxiliary at the courthouse. The naval band treated the town to a concert at the courthouse grounds until 10 p.m. and thus concluded a special day in Channel for veterans and their families.
The memorial monument was made of five recessed sections of granite, topped with a tapered column 10 feet high that held plates containing names and military symbols. The unveiling marked 11 years after the war that an enduring memorial was erected in memory of so many who suffered in the great conflict from this community. It would long stand in remembrance of the sailors and soldiers of Channel and Port aux Basques who made the supreme sacrifice. The names occupying the front face of the memorial are as follows:
From the Royal Newfoundland Regiment: Channel’s only Blue Puttee Lance-Cpl. Lewellyn J. Carter, Lance-Cpl. Edward A. Ayre, Lance-Cpl Morgan Gallop and privates Israel A. Anderson, Morley Soper, Edward J. Strickland, James H. LeRiche and Walter H. Mackay.
From the Royal Newfoundland Navy Reserve: Able Seamen George P. Bragg and James Anderson.
From Canadian regiments: privates George W. Stephens, Edgar L. Mackay and Enos E. Ash. Two names omitted at the time were privates Harry Dominy and Stanley E. Sealey.

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