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"Then blow ye winds heigh-o."


I see there's another girt big hurricane getting ready to attack the Gulf of Mexico.

I see there's another girt big hurricane getting ready to attack the Gulf of Mexico.
The people on CNN are saying this is the most powerful storm in the history of recording storms. Bigger even than Katrina, which pretty well inundated New Orleans. That's very strong.
Of course they exaggerate everything on that station. Chances are when it gets to where it's going it will have just enough wind to lift one maple leaf 3 inches off the ground. I can exaggerate as good as any American. I can even lie when I have to.
We never used to have storms like that in Newfoundland. Once in a while we'd get a bit of wind that caused a ripple or two in the ditches where we used to sail our boats, but never enough to sink them with their loads of d rusty nails (cars and trucks) and burned-out matches (timber).
Just the same every fall would bring its share of Northeast winds so that you could hear the surf pounding against the cliffs outside the narrows. Sooner or later, a great autumn gale would drive in when the huge swells kicked up by the heavy winds off the North Atlantic would pour into the harbour itself, making the motorboats buck against their moorings like wild stallions, and the smaller schooners heave promiscuously into and out of the waves.
I remember as a small boy staring unbelievingly at the Osmond Brothers large wharf as it crashed against the great sticks that enclosed the ballast of heavy boulders.
It was as if the lovely mountains surrounding Moreton's Harbor were themselves shaking. The wave action was weakening the structure of the wharf and as the day wore on it was apparent that significant damage had been done to it, and to the three fishing stages that were washed out in the harbour and the boat that had slipped its moorings and driven ashore.
In another small community of my youth I used to go out on the point where the rocks sloped into the sea and watch the surf for hours. On one such occasion, the waves carried in a school of long silvery fish.
I risked life and limb getting a couple dozen out of the water when each wave receded. No one in the harbour had ever seen their like before. But after I had told some lies about how I had gotten them, mother fried them up and they were delicious. After every storm that blew in after that I went out looking for more but never saw anything like them again.

The early part of autumn was usually calm and just a little chilly at night. But when November blew in, and I do mean "blew in", things could get downright wild and woolly. From bonfire night on, winter was only a snow dwigh away. The only saving grace, at least for youngsters, was that Christmas came with the first little banks of snow that drifted up along the sides of the road and filled in the frozen potholes.
Some of you older than me will remember stepping on one of those snow covered traps for the unwary and having your feet shoot out from beneath you and landing on your bottom. It happened to the younger crowd, too, but we didn't know about dignity.
Seeing the minister or the teacher or the Sunday school superintendent going sticks up was a great laughing matter for us but not for them. Dignity, you see. And fear of being laughed at, which was very real, especially if it was, someone else's father or someone else's grandmother, poor old dear.
Anyway, I predict that this greatest hurricane since Karl Wells retired and slipped from public view, perhaps inside one of his own storms, won't even get the dog wet if you drive him outdoors for a pee. It may not even touch the most Southeasterly rock on the Avalon Peninsula, as all other hurricanes have been trained to do since long before Karl – you know.
Many of you are aware that when a breeze of wind gusting to more than 15 k threatens the central and western parts of the island, not to mention Lab West and Nain, everyone in those areas is on their knees praying mightily that no part of the storm will reach West of Goobies.
Why do you people think people out here believe so strongly in the power of prayer?

I see there's another girt big hurricane getting ready to attack the Gulf of Mexico.
The people on CNN are saying this is the most powerful storm in the history of recording storms. Bigger even than Katrina, which pretty well inundated New Orleans. That's very strong.
Of course they exaggerate everything on that station. Chances are when it gets to where it's going it will have just enough wind to lift one maple leaf 3 inches off the ground. I can exaggerate as good as any American. I can even lie when I have to.
We never used to have storms like that in Newfoundland. Once in a while we'd get a bit of wind that caused a ripple or two in the ditches where we used to sail our boats, but never enough to sink them with their loads of d rusty nails (cars and trucks) and burned-out matches (timber).
Just the same every fall would bring its share of Northeast winds so that you could hear the surf pounding against the cliffs outside the narrows. Sooner or later, a great autumn gale would drive in when the huge swells kicked up by the heavy winds off the North Atlantic would pour into the harbour itself, making the motorboats buck against their moorings like wild stallions, and the smaller schooners heave promiscuously into and out of the waves.
I remember as a small boy staring unbelievingly at the Osmond Brothers large wharf as it crashed against the great sticks that enclosed the ballast of heavy boulders.
It was as if the lovely mountains surrounding Moreton's Harbor were themselves shaking. The wave action was weakening the structure of the wharf and as the day wore on it was apparent that significant damage had been done to it, and to the three fishing stages that were washed out in the harbour and the boat that had slipped its moorings and driven ashore.
In another small community of my youth I used to go out on the point where the rocks sloped into the sea and watch the surf for hours. On one such occasion, the waves carried in a school of long silvery fish.
I risked life and limb getting a couple dozen out of the water when each wave receded. No one in the harbour had ever seen their like before. But after I had told some lies about how I had gotten them, mother fried them up and they were delicious. After every storm that blew in after that I went out looking for more but never saw anything like them again.

The early part of autumn was usually calm and just a little chilly at night. But when November blew in, and I do mean "blew in", things could get downright wild and woolly. From bonfire night on, winter was only a snow dwigh away. The only saving grace, at least for youngsters, was that Christmas came with the first little banks of snow that drifted up along the sides of the road and filled in the frozen potholes.
Some of you older than me will remember stepping on one of those snow covered traps for the unwary and having your feet shoot out from beneath you and landing on your bottom. It happened to the younger crowd, too, but we didn't know about dignity.
Seeing the minister or the teacher or the Sunday school superintendent going sticks up was a great laughing matter for us but not for them. Dignity, you see. And fear of being laughed at, which was very real, especially if it was, someone else's father or someone else's grandmother, poor old dear.
Anyway, I predict that this greatest hurricane since Karl Wells retired and slipped from public view, perhaps inside one of his own storms, won't even get the dog wet if you drive him outdoors for a pee. It may not even touch the most Southeasterly rock on the Avalon Peninsula, as all other hurricanes have been trained to do since long before Karl – you know.
Many of you are aware that when a breeze of wind gusting to more than 15 k threatens the central and western parts of the island, not to mention Lab West and Nain, everyone in those areas is on their knees praying mightily that no part of the storm will reach West of Goobies.
Why do you people think people out here believe so strongly in the power of prayer?

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