Top News

Editorial: Worse things than the budget

 ..
..

Over the past month the province has been in upheaval because of the provincial budget, and for good reason.

Soon, if you want to fill your gas tank, you'll pay extra tax.

How about get some groceries? You'll pay extra.

Want to be a resident of Newfoundland and Labrador? That's right, you'll pay extra. And for some, it's in addition to a municipal poll tax they're already paying.

Businesses are closing up shop. People are planning on leaving the province and residents question how they can raise a family in a province closing libraries, taxing books and basically plucking every last cent from a minimum wage earner.

It may feel like the only thing we have going for us is the potential for the upturn of oil. That, and it's almost summer in most of the province.

But many have downshifted from the uproar and frustration of the budget, and have instead turned to empathy for other situations.

Just over two weeks ago five-year-old Quinn, a girl from Carbonear, was killed, allegedly at the hands of her father. That family, and especially Quinn's mother, are likely not thinking about the budget. Rather, they are sad they lost a precious and innocent child from their lives.

Then last week, Fort McMurray, or as some call it, "Little Newfoundland," went up in flames. Thousands of people are now without homes and jobs and it will likely be weeks before they head back to see the damage.

Many of those affected are Newfoundlanders and Labradorians.

Most people in Newfoundland and Labrador know someone living or working in Fort McMurray. And they are all devastated. They are devastated for the lost homes, they are devastated for the situation that their friends and family are in and they are devastated because, as of Thursday, the fire was still burning strong.

For both the death of Quinn and the tragedy in Fort Mac, people around the province have reached into their pockets and donated. Whether they have given a few dollars to the Red Cross for those in Alberta, or they have given a couple of bucks towards the Iris Kirby House in memory of Quinn, when it affects our own, the dollars don't matter.

For the past two weeks, during a time that is crucial to convince the government this tax or that closure are not right, many stopped to realize that it's life and those you love that are most important.

And while there are still so many fees and taxes that almost all of Newfoundlanders and Labradorians are not happy with, at the end of the day, it's not looking like we are going to be able to convince the government to change it.

So, even though many of us can't afford the tax hikes and fee increases, tomorrow we may not be here.

So focus on what is important, hug your children when they go to bed tonight and call that relative who lives a few provinces away - because no one knows what tomorrow will bring.

Soon, if you want to fill your gas tank, you'll pay extra tax.

How about get some groceries? You'll pay extra.

Want to be a resident of Newfoundland and Labrador? That's right, you'll pay extra. And for some, it's in addition to a municipal poll tax they're already paying.

Businesses are closing up shop. People are planning on leaving the province and residents question how they can raise a family in a province closing libraries, taxing books and basically plucking every last cent from a minimum wage earner.

It may feel like the only thing we have going for us is the potential for the upturn of oil. That, and it's almost summer in most of the province.

But many have downshifted from the uproar and frustration of the budget, and have instead turned to empathy for other situations.

Just over two weeks ago five-year-old Quinn, a girl from Carbonear, was killed, allegedly at the hands of her father. That family, and especially Quinn's mother, are likely not thinking about the budget. Rather, they are sad they lost a precious and innocent child from their lives.

Then last week, Fort McMurray, or as some call it, "Little Newfoundland," went up in flames. Thousands of people are now without homes and jobs and it will likely be weeks before they head back to see the damage.

Many of those affected are Newfoundlanders and Labradorians.

Most people in Newfoundland and Labrador know someone living or working in Fort McMurray. And they are all devastated. They are devastated for the lost homes, they are devastated for the situation that their friends and family are in and they are devastated because, as of Thursday, the fire was still burning strong.

For both the death of Quinn and the tragedy in Fort Mac, people around the province have reached into their pockets and donated. Whether they have given a few dollars to the Red Cross for those in Alberta, or they have given a couple of bucks towards the Iris Kirby House in memory of Quinn, when it affects our own, the dollars don't matter.

For the past two weeks, during a time that is crucial to convince the government this tax or that closure are not right, many stopped to realize that it's life and those you love that are most important.

And while there are still so many fees and taxes that almost all of Newfoundlanders and Labradorians are not happy with, at the end of the day, it's not looking like we are going to be able to convince the government to change it.

So, even though many of us can't afford the tax hikes and fee increases, tomorrow we may not be here.

So focus on what is important, hug your children when they go to bed tonight and call that relative who lives a few provinces away - because no one knows what tomorrow will bring.

Recent Stories