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Learning on the fly

Area youth recently got the opportunity to learn about the different aspects of salmon fishing, through a July 3 course held in Main Brook by the Quebec Labrador Foundation. Pictured, world-reknown fly tier Hans van Klinken teaches young Brady how to tie a fly.
Area youth recently got the opportunity to learn about the different aspects of salmon fishing, through a July 3 course held in Main Brook by the Quebec Labrador Foundation. Pictured, world-reknown fly tier Hans van Klinken teaches young Brady how to tie a fly.

Several youth from Main Brook and the surrounding communities gathered at the Main Brook Community Center on the morning of July 3 to learn about salmon fishing. The local youth were taught the intricacies of fly fishing for the coveted Atlantic salmon, a prized sport fish found in abundance throughout the rivers of the Northern Peninsula come mid July. Along with salmon, Main Brook also serves as a haven for tourists from around the world who travel to enjoy the hunting and fishing accommodations offered by Tuckamore Lodge.

The workshop emphasized best practices for maintaining a sustainable fishery such as catch and release, and educated the kids about threats like poaching, which can negatively affect a river’s salmon population. 

The workshop emphasized best practices for maintaining a sustainable fishery such as catch and release, and educated the kids about threats like poaching, which can negatively affect a river’s salmon population. 

Tuckamore Lodge hunting and fishing guide, Junior Flynn, shows Ethan how to cast. Submitted photos

The youth then had the rare opportunity to learn fly tying from world-renowned angler and fly tier Hans van Klinken. Mr. van Klinken gave each child a chance to create and name his or her own unique fly. Along with fly tying, youth were taught casting techniques and invaluable knowledge of the rivers from local guide and expert Junior Flynn, who guides hunting and fishing trips in Main Brook and the nearby vicinity for people from around the world.

The workshop continued with presentations by student volunteers from the Quebec Labrador Foundation, a non-profit organization focusing on environmental conservation and stewardship. The presentations concentrated on the rules and regulations of fishing for Atlantic salmon, along with the ecology and local history of the popular sport fish. The morning concluded by encouraging the local youth to take advantage of the natural resources available to them, while keeping in mind the importance of preserving salmon populations for future generations.

Ecotourism brings streams of income to communities like Main Brook and Hawkes Bay. It can provide new opportunities for youth who choose to stay in rural Newfoundland rather than leave for work elsewhere, such as the crude oil industry in Alberta or the hydroelectric project at Muskrat Falls. A theme of the workshop was intended to encourage local youth to grow to become local guides and experts, further supporting the crucial tourism industry on the Northern Peninsula.

 

 

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