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Beothuk Energy ups the ante

np-28122015-wind_cc-1.jpg
np-28122015-wind_cc-1.jpg

The company planning a wind farm and manufacturing facility in Newfoundland and Labrador has proposed a separate, larger project for Nova Scotia, with a related subsea transmission link running into the United States.

The wind power concept, including 1,000 megawatts of installed capacity and the 370-kilometre (200 nautical mile) "Can-Am Link," is estimated to have a cost of roughly $4 billion.
Separate project plans for a smaller, 180-megawatt facility in Newfoundland and Labrador -- as announced in 2013 and estimated at a capital cost of $400 million -- are still being pursued, company president and CEO Kirby Mercer confirmed.
Beothuk Energy is looking at the power potential of the region, he said, as opposed to one province, with the aim of capitalizing on a growing demand for renewable energy in the United States.
An exact site for the Nova Scotia wind farm was not revealed in the company's latest statement.
"The proposed site has world-class wind resources and will be located about twenty kilometers from shore in shallow waters of thirty meters or less," it reads. "It will be outside of major shipping lanes and commercial fishing grounds. The Can-Am Link will make landfall close to existing transmission facilities near Boston giving access to the New England transmission corridors."
Kirby said the company has been in contact with the Canadian Department of Public Works and Services about its development site in Nova Scotia and the project in this province.
Here, the company has yet to apply for environmental assessment on any part of its project plans, but Mercer said the final design is being prepared.
"I think you're going to see some really detailed stuff coming up. I was thinking in the next 100 days," he said, when asked about a filing.
Since its original announcement, Beothuk Energy has secured partnerships with Jacob Capital Management (for assistance in project financing), Siemens Offshore Wind (on manufacturing), Talon Energy (with an equity stake in Beothuk Energy) and Maderra Engineering.

The wind power concept, including 1,000 megawatts of installed capacity and the 370-kilometre (200 nautical mile) "Can-Am Link," is estimated to have a cost of roughly $4 billion.
Separate project plans for a smaller, 180-megawatt facility in Newfoundland and Labrador -- as announced in 2013 and estimated at a capital cost of $400 million -- are still being pursued, company president and CEO Kirby Mercer confirmed.
Beothuk Energy is looking at the power potential of the region, he said, as opposed to one province, with the aim of capitalizing on a growing demand for renewable energy in the United States.
An exact site for the Nova Scotia wind farm was not revealed in the company's latest statement.
"The proposed site has world-class wind resources and will be located about twenty kilometers from shore in shallow waters of thirty meters or less," it reads. "It will be outside of major shipping lanes and commercial fishing grounds. The Can-Am Link will make landfall close to existing transmission facilities near Boston giving access to the New England transmission corridors."
Kirby said the company has been in contact with the Canadian Department of Public Works and Services about its development site in Nova Scotia and the project in this province.
Here, the company has yet to apply for environmental assessment on any part of its project plans, but Mercer said the final design is being prepared.
"I think you're going to see some really detailed stuff coming up. I was thinking in the next 100 days," he said, when asked about a filing.
Since its original announcement, Beothuk Energy has secured partnerships with Jacob Capital Management (for assistance in project financing), Siemens Offshore Wind (on manufacturing), Talon Energy (with an equity stake in Beothuk Energy) and Maderra Engineering.

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